Mom Helps Honor Miscarriage With Empowering Rainbow Baby Shirts

Proof that there's life after loss.
ByHana Maeda
Published
Oct 2016
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Photo: Vaughn Dabney

Almost all mommy-and-me matching getups are adorable, yes. But it’s the reason why one psychologist created a new line of t-shirts that they’re completely stealing our hearts.

Jessica Zucker, PhD, who specializes in women’s reproductive and maternal mental health, created a special collection of rainbow t-shirts and tote bags reading “Mama” and “Babe.” The reason why? To celebrate rainbow babies—babies born after mom’s experienced a miscarriage, stillbirth or loss. Zucker, who suffered a miscarriage herself, created the designs in hopes of changing the dialogue surrounding miscarriage, aiming to put a positive spin on loss.

Photo: Jessica Zucker

“The shirts aim to: de-stigmatize loss, put a face to the statistics and move away from shame, to own our stories, to foster connection and community,” she tells The Huffington Post.

Between 10 and 25 percent of pregnancies in the United States end in miscarriage, so it’s safe to say this type of pregnancy loss is a prevalent issue. But because of the associated difficult emotions, women are less likely to share their experiences, often leading to a feeling of isolation.

“We need not be ashamed of our reproductive histories,” Zucker says. “Pregnancy after pregnancy loss can be quite harrowing ― these items also aim to stimulate conversations among women who have been there, who have struggled, who know what it’s like.”

By sporting these shirts and tote bags, Zucker hopes to band together communities of women with shared experiences and spark intelligent discussions about pregnancy loss.

Photo: Katherine Emrick

“My hope is that women turn toward their mothers, grandmothers, aunts, great-grandmothers and so on to learn about their reproductive histories, bolstering communication around this vital topic that needn’t remain on the fringes,” she says.

Zucker wants women to “express pride” and share stories about their individual experiences instead of feeling guilty over their loss.

Photo: Jessica Zucker

“These items work against the shame and instead show a sense of pride for our histories and journeys and allow women to say, ‘I had a miscarriage or pregnancy loss(es)’ without saying it outright,” she says.

Opening up about loss is never easy. But Zucker is one of many women looking to change that. Most recently, mom-to-be Jessica shared a breathtaking maternity shoot honoring her own rainbow baby, demonstrating another way to celebrate life while recognizing loss.

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