Q&A: "Mixed Deliveries"?

How often do "mixed deliveries" happen, when one baby is born vaginally and another is born by c-section?
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ByKaren Moise, RN
Registered Nurse
Updated
Feb 2017
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Since twins can be delivered vaginally more than half the time, this is often the preferred method of delivery for many women. However, it is possible that a problem may occur with the second baby after the first baby is born, so in an emergency, a “mixed delivery” may result — where one baby is born vaginally and another is born via c-section. Luckily though, this is pretty rare — only happening to about 3 to 4 percent of twin births in total — and is usually the result of an uncommon problem (for example, the placenta tearing away from the wall of the uterus prematurely).

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