What Are Subcutaneous Injections?

What are subcutaneous injections, and how can they help me get pregnant?
Save article
ByLaurence A. Jacobs, MD, reproductive endocrinologist, Fertility Centers of Illinois
Fertility Specialist
Updated
Jan 2017
Hero Image

If you are visiting a fertility specialist, you’ll very likely become intimately familiar with subcutaneous (or sub-Q, for short) injections. These shots are administered in the fatty layer of tissue just beneath the skin. Blood vessels course their way through this tissue, which makes it easy for medications to reach their ultimate destinations and do their job. Almost all of the medications required for fertility assistance are taken subcutaneously. The good news is that the needle required is very small, so the shots feel like nothing more than a small pinprick.

Sub-Q shots are also easier to give to yourself, so you don’t have to drag your partner or con a friend into helping you out. Typically the shots are taken in the belly or upper thigh, where (truth be told) most of us have the greatest amount of easily accessed fatty tissue. A few fertility meds are administered as intramuscular injections — injected into the muscle — which require a bigger needle (and maybe a bit more courage).

Plus, more from The Bump:

Related Video
Save article

8 Signs of Fertility to Look for Each Month

Temeka Zore, MD
OB-GYN and Infertility Specialist

10 Things to Avoid When Trying to Conceive

Temeka Zore, MD
OB-GYN and Infertility Specialist

Peanut App Launches TTC Platform to Help Women Find a Safe Community

Nehal Aggarwal
Associate Editor
Published
11/18/2019

How to Get Pregnant Fast

Stacey Feintuch
Contributing Writer

How to Boost Your Fertility in Your 30s

Anna Davies
Contributing Writer

Men Should Go to Bed by This Time if They’re Trying to Conceive

Stephanie Grassullo
Associate Editor
Published
06/26/2019

Researchers May Have Found an Easy Way to Treat Endometriosis

Stephanie Grassullo
Associate Editor
Published
05/01/2019

Can Herbs Boost My Fertility?

Wayne S. Maxson, MD, medical director, reproductive endocrinologist, and founder, IVF Florida Reproductive Associates
Fertility Specialist
Article removed.