BookmarkBookmarkTick

Delaying Baby’s Vaccines Is Sometimes Risky (Sometimes Not!) Says Study

ByAnisa Arsenault
Associate Editor
Updated
March 2, 2017
Hero Image

You know there’s a recommended vaccine schedule, but did you ever wonder what would happen if you missed one of the recommended shots? Or if you delayed a shot? Well, one of the risks of getting them late is seizures. And a new study published by the American Academy of Pediatrics journal Pediatrics suggests the risk isn’t much — if you stay within baby’s first year or so.

After following 323,427 babies, researchers found that timing of receiving the MMR (measles-mumps-rubella) and MMRV (measles-mumps-rubella-varicella) vaccines didn’t affect their seizure risk if the babies had them in their first 12 to 15 months. But if they put off the vaccine past 15 months, the rate of seizures associated with first-time vaccination gets higher. (This risk was higher with the MMRV vaccine than the MMR.) The seizures don’t necessarily happen right away; they can occur up to 10 days after the vaccination.

Something to keep in mind is that babies 38 to 92 days old are less likely to have seizures than older infants anyway. But this study may be one more reason to opt for on-time vaccinations.

Did you stick to the recommended vaccine schedule?

Related Video

Tool: Vaccine Tracker

profile picture of The Bump Editors
The Bump Editors
nervous woman stands by window

Study Shows Many Parents Still Don’t Trust Routine Childhood Vaccines

profile picture of Nehal Aggarwal
Nehal Aggarwal
Associate Editor
Published
06/29/2020
mom holding her baby after it had a vaccine

New Technique Makes Vaccines Safe in Warmer Temperatures, Study Finds

profile picture of Nehal Aggarwal
Nehal Aggarwal
Associate Editor
Published
06/09/2020
city of boston historic buildings

These Are the Best and Worst States for Vaccination Rates, Report Says

profile picture of Nehal Aggarwal
Nehal Aggarwal
Associate Editor
Published
01/17/2020
sad teddy bear looking out rainy window

Measles Virus Completely Wipes Out Your Immune System, Studies Find

profile picture of Nehal Aggarwal
Nehal Aggarwal
Associate Editor
Published
11/05/2019
phone screen that shows mock up of vaccine pop up

Facebook and Instagram Debut New Strategy to Combat Vaccine Myths

profile picture of Laurie Ulster
Laurie Ulster
Contributing Writer
Published
09/05/2019
two women having serious conversation

How to Talk About Vaccines Without Starting a Fight

profile picture of Stephanie Grassullo
Stephanie Grassullo
Associate Editor
Published
06/11/2019
new york city's empire state building covered by dots that resemble measles rash

CDC: Measles Cases Have Now Hit a More Than 25-Year High

profile picture of Stephanie Grassullo
Stephanie Grassullo
Associate Editor
Published
05/31/2019
bar graph showing growth

Report: These Places in the US Have the Highest Risk of a Measles Outbreak

profile picture of Stephanie Grassullo
Stephanie Grassullo
Associate Editor
Published
05/10/2019
woman's hand holding her phone, which shows instagram icon and a vaccine

Instagram Doubles Down Efforts to Stop the Spread of Misinformation on Vaccines

profile picture of Stephanie Grassullo
Stephanie Grassullo
Associate Editor
Published
05/09/2019

Q&A: Modified Immunization Schedule?

profile picture of Dr. Cheryl Wu
Dr. Cheryl Wu
Pediatrician
Little boy with bandaid on arm looking at camera

NYC Declares Public Health Emergency, Orders Mandatory Measles Vaccinations

profile picture of Stephanie Grassullo
Stephanie Grassullo
Associate Editor
Published
04/09/2019
young school children sitting with their arms around each other

Italy Will Now Ban Unvaccinated Kids From School

profile picture of Stephanie Grassullo
Stephanie Grassullo
Associate Editor
Published
03/13/2019
medical researcher performing tests in a lab

Massive New Study Once Again Proves No Link Between Vaccines and Autism

profile picture of Stephanie Grassullo
Stephanie Grassullo
Associate Editor
Published
03/05/2019
Article removed.