IKEA Is Designing Forts to Help Keep Kids Busy in Lockdown

"Parents no longer know how else they can entertain their children being stuck inside four walls."
ByNehal Aggarwal
Associate Editor
Published
May 2020
baby in couch fort during quarantine
Photo: Getty Images

If you’re sick of baking bread and looking for something to both help pass the time inside and keep your little ones entertained, Ikea has you covered. Ikea Russia recently partnered with Instinct, a creative agency, to create a guide on how to build forts using simple household items, such as sheets, chairs, pillows and more.

The guide, which is available on Ikea Russia’s Instagram page, features six types of models, including a fortress, a castle, a wigwam, a house, a cave and a camping tent. Structured like Ikea’s typical furniture instructions, the guide provides a list of the supplies needed and a step-by-step breakdown of how to build.

"#StayHome was the general slogan of this spring. Self-isolation and quarantine measures are ongoing,” the company said in a press release. “Parents no longer know how else they can entertain their children being stuck inside four walls.”

If you’re looking for ways to keep your little ones happy and occupied, building a fort may help—no screws and tools required. Plus, if you’re looking for more ideas on how to keep kids entertained indoors, check out some of our top tips.

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