Grimes Says She Isn’t Afraid to Stray From Typical Media Content for Babies

“I’ve watched Apocalypse Now and stuff with my baby. He’s into radical art. Like, he just actually is, and I don’t think it’s problematic to engage with them on that level.”
Save article
ByNehal Aggarwal
Associate Editor
Published
Oct 2020
singer grimes talks about what she uses for media entertainment for her baby
Photo: Getty Images

When it comes to raising her son, Claire Boucher, the singer and producer better known as Grimes isn’t afraid to branch out from societal norms.

The new mom, 32, welcomed a now 5-month-old son, X Æ A-XII Musk, though she affectionately calls him, “X,” with boyfriend Elon Musk. In a recent interview she opened up about her struggles with getting him to sleep—and her solution for him

“When you have a baby, you’re always using white noise machines. It’s much easier to get them to sleep if you train them on some kind of audio situation. And so I was just like, could this be more artistic? In general, stuff for babies is really just creatively bad. I don’t want your first introduction to the world to just be all this aimless crap,” she told The New York Times, adding, “OK, wait, wait. I’m not insulting babies. I’m just, it’s all very one vibe. I just feel like getting out of the like, ‘Here’s a zebra and a bear in, like, pastel color tones’ energy. That’s just one very small sort of creative lens that things can be looked at through.”

She continued to say that she believes babies “do have taste. They definitely like some things. They don’t like other things. They fully have opinions.” Grimes went on to explain to the outlet that her son had helped create the A.I. Lullaby, released this week, she made in collaboration with Endel, an app that uses A.I. technology to put out soundscapes for various moods.

“The first version, there [were] too many sort of sharp bells, and it caused tears and just general chaos,” she told The New York Times, adding that as she played around with certain sounds X would begin to smile more. “I was basically personally just referencing ambient music I’ve heard, and then kind of trying to make it cuter. It’s a bit sparklier, a bit nicer.”

She also told the outlet her son is turning into quite the art critic. “I’ve watched Apocalypse Now and stuff with my baby,” she said. “He’s into radical art. Like, he just actually is, and I don’t think it’s problematic to engage with them on that level.”

Save article

We Don’t Need Autism Awareness—We Need Autism Acceptance, Study Says

Nehal Aggarwal
Associate Editor
Published
03/30/2021

Two Videos That Are Great Places to Start When Talking to Kids About Racism

Nehal Aggarwal
Associate Editor
Published
10/14/2020

Parents Need to Start Talking to Their Kids About Race Sooner, Study Says

Nehal Aggarwal
Associate Editor
Published
08/28/2020

How to Handle Bullying in Preschool

Lisa Milbrand
Contributing Writer

Children’s Books to Help You Talk to Your Kids About Race and Racism

Brittany Murlas
Founder and CEO of Little Feminist

How to Teach Toddlers to Share

Katherine Martinelli

Barbie Launches 2020 Campaign Team Dolls to Inspire All Young Leaders

Nehal Aggarwal
Associate Editor
Published
07/31/2020

Stitch Fix Is Launching a New Gender-Neutral Clothing Line for Kids

Nehal Aggarwal
Associate Editor
Published
07/29/2020
Article removed.