BookmarkBookmarkTickBookmarkAddCheckBoxFilledCheckBoxCircleBumpCheckedFilledMedical

Almost All New Moms Feel Pressure to Hide Anxiety and Depression, Survey Reveals

An alarming 91 percent of women say there is pressure from society to hide the struggles, anxieties and sadness of motherhood.
save article
profile picture of Stephanie Grassullo
By Stephanie Grassullo, Contributing Writer
Published November 21, 2018
sad woman with downcast contemplative expression
Image: Nick Owuor Astro

Despite the fact that postpartum depression (PPD) is one of the most common medical complications of childbirth, the condition is still vastly misunderstood, a new survey reveals.

The online research was conducted by HealthyWomen and Sage Therapeutics, and surveyed more than 1,000 women who are pregnant or plan to become pregnant to find out about their experience with PPD. Its goal was to identify the level of awareness surrounding the condition, in addition to how well doctors are educating women on maternal depression. The findings? Much more education is needed.

Key Takeaways

A stigma still exists

  • Of the women surveyed, 51 percent who had been diagnosed with PPD think it is an embarrassing diagnosis to receive
  • And 32 percent say if they were to experience PPD, they would be less likely to have more kids
  • An alarming 91 percent of women feel there is societal pressure to hide the struggles, anxieties and sadness of motherhood

More education is needed

  • Most women—51 percent—didn’t realize PPD is often associated with the rising and falling hormone levels between pregnancy and birth
  • Only 38 percent of women were aware suicidal thoughts can be a symptom of PPD

“With more resources available and more celebrities openly sharing their stories, I am surprised that our survey revealed many women and healthcare professionals are still not having the conversation about PPD and its signs and symptoms—which could lead to women suffering unnecessarily,” says Beth Battaglino, CEO of HealthyWomen. “Mothers need to feel supported and encouraged to ask for help. Receiving an accurate diagnosis and appropriate management of the condition are crucial, as PPD not only affects the mother, but can have a significant impact on the whole family.”

Learn more about PPD so you can be aware of the signs and symptoms to watch for. And be sure to speak to your doctor about the condition so you can work together to avoid it from affecting you.

Remember, you’re not alone. Many brave moms have spoken up about PPD to help others who are suffering. Just look at Paige Bellenbaum, whose PPD was so bad she almost ended her life. Luckily, the mom was able to get the treatment she needed before it was too late, and now dedicates her life to being a champion for the cause.

Please note: The Bump and the materials and information it contains are not intended to, and do not constitute, medical or other health advice or diagnosis and should not be used as such. You should always consult with a qualified physician or health professional about your specific circumstances.

save article
Article removed.
Name added. View Your List
ADVERTISEMENT

Next on Your Reading List

mother holding newborn baby at home
What You Need to Know About Postpartum OCD
Medically Reviewed by Kendra Segura, MD
mother looking at newborn baby
Premenstrual Disorders Linked to Higher Risk of Perinatal Depression
By Wyndi Kappes
depressed mother holding newborn baby at home
Women With Autoimmune Diseases at Higher Risk of Postpartum Depression
By Wyndi Kappes
ADVERTISEMENT
mother massaging baby feet
Participating in Baby Massage Lessens Postpartum Depression Symptoms
By Wyndi Kappes
mom holding newborn baby at home
First Pill to Treat Postpartum Depression Set to Cost $15,900
By Wyndi Kappes
Britney Spears arrives for the premiere of Sony Pictures' "Once Upon a Time... in Hollywood" at the TCL Chinese Theatre in Hollywood, California on July 22, 2019
Britney Spears Reflects on Postpartum Depression in New Memoir
By Wyndi Kappes
dad holding crying baby at home
Dads Should Be Screened for Postpartum Depression Too, Study Says
By Wyndi Kappes
ADVERTISEMENT
the mom therapist postpartum math reel
Postpartum Math: Therapist’s Reel Addresses New Mom Struggles
By Wyndi Kappes
mother and baby smiling and cuddling
10 Actionable Ways to Boost Your Postpartum Mental Health
By Wyndi Kappes
Kylie Jenner attends the 2022 Baby2Baby Gala presented by Paul Mitchell at Pacific Design Center on November 12, 2022 in West Hollywood, California
Kylie Jenner Encourages Postpartum Moms to ‘Stay Inside That Moment’
By Wyndi Kappes
ADVERTISEMENT
Illustrations of disney princesses postpartum
Artist Reimagines Disney Princesses as Relatable Postpartum Parents
By Wyndi Kappes
close up of mother holding baby
How the New National Maternal Mental Health Taskforce Will Help Moms
By Wyndi Kappes
Elyse Myers attends TikTok House Party at VidCon 2022 at a private venue on June 23, 2022 in Anaheim, California
Elyse Myers Shares How Her Postpartum Struggles Led to Her First Video
By Wyndi Kappes
ADVERTISEMENT
mother holding newborn baby's head
New Discovery Could Revolutionize How We Treat Postpartum Depression
By Wyndi Kappes
Kylie Jenner and Travis Scott are expecting their second baby.
Kylie Jenner's Story Reminds Us All Postpartum Journeys Are Different
By Wyndi Kappes
mother holding newborn baby in hospital bed after giving birth
8 Ways Black Moms Can Lower Their Risk of Postpartum Depression
By Ericka Sóuter
mother lying with newborn baby in bed at home
These States Join a Growing List Offering a Full Year of Postpartum Care
By Wyndi Kappes
ADVERTISEMENT
baby twins in mother's lap on bed
New Study Identifies Women at Highest Risk of Postpartum Depression
By Wyndi Kappes
pregnant woman doing yoga
Study: Yoga and Mindfulness Can Help Prevent Postpartum Depression
By Nehal Aggarwal
What to Expect Emotionally After Birth
What to Expect Emotionally After Birth
By Yelena Moroz Alpert
ADVERTISEMENT
Article removed.