BookmarkBookmarkTick

Does Being Born in the U.S. Make You More Likely to Have Allergies?

ByKylie McConville
Updated
March 2, 2017
Hero Image
Image: Thinkstock / The Bump

A new study published today in the journal JAMA Pediatrics concluded that children living in the United States are more likely to have allergies than children born elsewhere but now living in the United States.

Researchers involved in the study examined data from more than 91,600 children under the age of 18 who had taken part in the 2007-08 National Survey of Children’s Health. The analysis revealed that children born outside the country were significantly less likely to have allergies, including asthma, eczema, hay fever and food allergies.

Although, the risk of certain allergies among foreign-born children does increase after they have lived in the U.S. for a decade. Researchers also found that foreign-born children whose parents were also born outside of the U.S, were much less likely to have allergies, compared to their American born counterparts whose parents were born here in the U.S.

Dr. Jonathan Silverberg of St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center in New York concluded, "Foreign-born Americans have significantly lower risk of allergic disease than U.S.-born Americans. However, foreign-born Americans develop increased risk for allergic disease with prolonged residence in the United States.

The most interesting finding during the study, however, was that researchers found that the risk of certain allergies among foreign-born children actually increases after they’ve lived here for a decade.

Do your children have allergies?** How do you deal?**

Related Video
newborn baby photographed with fall leaves and a pumpkin

Babies Born in the Fall May Be at Higher Risk of Allergic Diseases

profile picture of Nehal Aggarwal
Nehal Aggarwal
Associate Editor
Published
09/22/2020
peanut butter in dish surrounded by peanuts

The FDA Has Approved the First-Ever Treatment for Peanut Allergies

profile picture of Nehal Aggarwal
Nehal Aggarwal
Associate Editor
Published
02/04/2020
peanut butter in a jar surrounded by peanuts

New Treatment May Provide Much-Needed Protection From Peanut Allergies

profile picture of Laurie Ulster
Laurie Ulster
Contributing Writer
Published
09/05/2019
little girl having allergic reaction

This Is What Really Happens When a Kid Has a Severe Allergic Reaction

profile picture of Stephanie Grassullo
Stephanie Grassullo
Associate Editor
Published
03/12/2019
little girl making peanut butter sandwich and licking her hand

Groundbreaking Peanut Allergy Drug Could Save Lives

profile picture of Stephanie Grassullo
Stephanie Grassullo
Associate Editor
Published
11/19/2018
tia mowry opens up about her daughter's peanut allergy

Tia Mowry Shares How Her Son's Severe Allergy Changed Her Family’s Life

profile picture of Stephanie Grassullo
Stephanie Grassullo
Associate Editor
Published
10/30/2018
teal pumpkin at target lets people know their house has allergy safe candy options

Mom's Viral PSA on Teal Pumpkins Makes Halloween Safer for Kids With Allergies

profile picture of Stephanie Grassullo
Stephanie Grassullo
Associate Editor
Published
10/04/2018
nima peanut sensor for kids with peanut allergies

You Need to Know About This New Machine if Your Kid Has Peanut Allergies

profile picture of Stephanie Grassullo
Stephanie Grassullo
Associate Editor
Published
09/07/2018
woman's hands opening epipen

Parents Can Give Kids Expired EpiPens as Shortage Continues, FDA Says

profile picture of Ashley Edwards Walker
Ashley Edwards Walker
Contributing Writer
Published
08/23/2018
parent changing baby's diaper

Overusing Baby Wipes Is 'a Recipe for Developing Food Allergy,' Study Finds

profile picture of Anisa Arsenault
Anisa Arsenault
Associate Editor
Published
04/06/2018
Article removed.