This GIF Helps You See What Baby Sees

Watch and learn.
ByKelly Corbett
Published
Jan 2017
baby laying down and looking at camera at 3 months old
Photo: Lesley Mango

Have you ever wondered what the world looks like through baby’s eyes? Thanks to a GIF simulating an infant’s constantly-changing eyesight, now you can.

Romesh Angunawela, a consultant eye surgeon at Moorfields Eye Hospital in London, teamed up with an eye clinic to create a GIF that illustrates how babies’ vision develops each month during their first year. The GIF shows that until baby reaches 3 months old, he or she is unable to focus on faces, even if they’re close up.

"At birth, a baby sees things more clearly at 8 to 10 centimeters, but their range of vision extends as they grow,” Angunawela tells Business Insider. (Watch here how you can help encourage newborn eye development.) He adds that the visual cortex of a baby’s brain starts learning how to process information from the moment baby first opens his eyes. It just takes time and growth to get used to processing that information.

The ability to better see your face at the 3-month mark usually coincides with another milestone: baby’s first smile.

By 2 years old, eyesight is fully developed.

"This coincides with increased interest and exploration of the world around them,” Angunawela says.

Things still seem a little fuzzy regarding baby’s vision development? Check out the must-see GIF for a better picture of the world from baby’s perspective.

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