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Urinary Problems in Babies

Weird odors? Pain? Frequent peeing? We got to the bottom of the most common urinary issues in babies.
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profile picture of Jennifer Shu, MD
Pediatrician
Updated
March 2, 2017
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Image: Alexandra Grablewski

What are urinary problems in babies?

Any noticeable change in odor or frequency of her pee, or if she seems to be having pain when she’s going number one, could be a signal there’s an issue.

What could be causing my baby’s urinary problem?

Most often you can blame a  bladder infection for a potential pee issue. Because of their down-there geography, girls tend to get these more than boys. Dehydration can also change the color or smell of urine (resulting in very dark or pungent urine). It’s unlikely, but if she’s peeing very often (and also seems more thirsty, irritable, hungry), it could be a sign of type 1 diabetes.
 
When should I bring my baby to the doctor with a urinary problem?

If the condition seems to be lasting more than a few days, or if it’s accompanied by other severe symptoms (pain, fever, extreme fatigue), see your doctor to rule out an infection or irritation.

What should I do to treat my baby’s urinary problem?

Start by helping her flush things through by giving her lots of fluids throughout the day. If you suspect a bladder infection, don’t overdo it on the bubble baths — too much soap can irritate the opening of the urethra (the exit path of the bladder where urine comes out). And of course, take her to the pediatrician to diagnose the problem.

Please note: The Bump and the materials and information it contains are not intended to, and do not constitute, medical or other health advice or diagnosis and should not be used as such. You should always consult with a qualified physician or health professional about your specific circumstances.

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