Finally! the FDA Bans BPA in Baby Bottles

ByLindsay Barton
Published
Jul 2012
baby bottles arranged with purple gradient
Photo: Nicholas Eveleigh / Getty Images

Moms, we know you’ve been checking the baby bottles you buy for that “BPA-free” label. Pretty soon, you may not have to.

Tuesday, the U.S. federal government announced that baby bottles and sippy cups can no longer contain the chemical bisphenol-A (BPA). The decision was made after The American Chemistry Council asked the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to make the ban, so starting in October, it will be unlawful to sell baby bottles with BPA in them. However, currently manufacturers say they haven’t use the chemical in bottles and sippies in years, and we’re guessing all the bottles you see in the store are marked BPA-free.

So, what’s so scary about BPA? Some researchers believe ingestion of the chemical disrupts the reproductive and nervous system in babies and young children. Other studies suggest exposure to BPA can cause behavior problems and childhood asthma. But chemical makers stand by the belief that the chemical is safe for food and drink uses. The FDA says it hasn’t found proof that humans are negatively affected by BPA; they’re spending $30 million on studies to further test the effects of BPA.

What do you think of the BPA ban? Do you double-check baby’s gear to make sure it’s BPA-free?

The Hidden Danger Inside Baby's Sippy Cup

Anisa Arsenault
Associate Editor
Published
02/24/2016

Q&A: Is My Baby Hungry?

Nancy Mohrbacher, IBCLC, FILCA
Lactation Specialist

Q&A: Can Baby Drink From a Cup?

Jack Newman, MD, FRCPC
Pediatrician

Q&A: Nighttime Feedings While Away?

Nancy Mohrbacher, IBCLC, FILCA
Lactation Specialist

The Pros and Cons of Pacifier Use

Yelena Moroz Alpert
Contributing Writer

What to Know About Infant Tongue Tie

Anna Davies
Contributing Writer

95 Percent of Major Baby Food Brands Contain Toxic Metals, Study Says

Nehal Aggarwal
Associate Editor
Published
10/18/2019

Q&A: Keeping Baby Hydrated?

Nancy Mohrbacher, IBCLC, FILCA
Lactation Specialist

Milk Protein Intolerance in Babies

Jennifer L.W. Fink
Registered Nurse