Q&A: Can Pumping Help?

How can pumping help me make breast milk for my adopted baby?
ByErin van Vuuren
Updated
Feb 2017
Hero Image

Using a breast pump stimulates your nipple and triggers the release of a hormone called prolactin, which helps signal your body to produce milk. Pumping your breasts has the potential to increase milk glands and ducts in your breasts, can help prepare your breasts for nursing, and may begin to stimulate your supply…but it may not be totally necessary. A nursing supplementer (a device that allows baby to receive formula or donated milk while suckling on your breast) may be a better way to stimulate your milk production since your body is more likely to respond to a human than a machine. Work with a lactation consultant to find your best plan for breastfeeding your baby.

Related Video

The Mission Behind the ‘if Men Breastfed’ Video Is No Laughing Matter

Anisa Arsenault
Associate Editor
Published
12/09/2016

I’m Pumping. How Do I Get Baby to Breastfeed?

Gina Ciagne, certified lactation counselor and senior director of professional relations for Lansinoh
Lactation Specialist

Why This Mom Started Pumping in the Lobby of a Major Hotel

Anisa Arsenault
Associate Editor
Published
08/19/2016

Breastfeeding Mom Puts Delta on Blast for Preventing Her From Pumping in Privacy

Stephanie Grassullo
Associate Editor
Published
06/04/2019

Q&A: Letdown or Supply Issue?

Jeanne Cygnus, IBCLC, RLC
Lactation Specialist

Q&A: Checking Milk Supply?

Jeanne Cygnus, IBCLC, RLC
Lactation Specialist