Chrissy Teigen's Baby Has Eczema and She's Already Defending Herself

Did she answer all your questions?
ByAnisa Arsenault
Associate Editor
Published
Dec 2016
Black and white closeup of Chrissy Teigen
Photo: Getty Images

About 1 in 10 babies will develop eczema, a skin condition resulting in itchy red, dry patches. One of the unlucky 10 percent? Chrissy Teigen and John Legend’s daughter, Luna. And Teigen has a few things she’d like to clarify.

“Yes she has rosy eczema cheeks, yes we are taking care of it, no it’s not a gluten allergy, no it’s not our makeup, no it’s not from our perfume, yes she’s just a baby,” Teigen posted on Instagram.

What’s happening here? Teigen is preemptively defending herself from those social media users who will—and they will—point a finger at her for not doing anything to treat or prevent this. But the only source of blame for eczema is genetics; family history and allergies are both precursors.

We can’t blame Teigen for jumping to the defense; the mommy shaming started as soon as she took her first date night and has continued with recent remarks about how she holds her baby. Being in the spotlight with a baby is never easy, but Teigen’s proving a little eczema won’t stop her from sharing photos of Luna.

Eczema typically improves significantly over the course of baby’s first year. To help clear it up, the first method of treatment is moisturizing. Emollients can be used to decrease dryness and ease any discomfort from cracked skin. Talk to your pediatrician about low-dose anti-inflammatory ointments for more severe cases.

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