BookmarkBookmarkTick

Q&A: Do Mosquitoes Bite Pregnant Women More?

Is it true that mosquitoes are more likely to bite pregnant women?
ByKerry Dougherty
Updated
March 2, 2017
Hero Image

We’ve heard this one too. And while nothing’s been proven on the subject yet, there are definitely lots of theories floating around out there as to why. Here are two of the biggest:

Theory 1: Mosquitoes are attracted to carbon dioxide. Later on in pregnancy, you’ll tend to breathe more heavily, releasing more air (21 percent to be exact) than non-pregnant women do. Some think the mosquitoes are drawn to the fact that you’re giving off more CO2.

Theory 2: When you’re pregnant, your body temperature rises. This increase in body heat means that your skin releases more volatile substances, which make it easier for mosquitoes to find you.

The larger amounts of carbon dioxide, mixed with the rise in body temperature, make pregnant women a feast for mosquitoes. Be sure to take precautions when you’re outside — mosquitoes can carry diseases that could be harmful to you and baby.

Related Video
Hatch's maternity clothing sale, pictured erika dress and yuri jumpsuit

The Best Items to Shop From HATCH Collection’s End of Season Sale

profile picture of Nehal Aggarwal
Nehal Aggarwal
Associate Editor
Published
07/28/2021
Mori launches new basic maternity clothing line.

MORI Launches Its First-Ever Maternity Clothing Line: Mama by MORI

profile picture of Nehal Aggarwal
Nehal Aggarwal
Associate Editor
Published
07/27/2021
JC Penny launches inclusive clothing kids line.

JCPenney Has Launched an Amazing New Line of Inclusive Kids Clothing

profile picture of Nehal Aggarwal
Nehal Aggarwal
Associate Editor
Published
07/27/2021
Shawn Johnson gives birth to a baby boy.

Shawn Johnson and Andrew East Welcome a Baby Boy

profile picture of Lauren Barth
Lauren Barth
Senior Editor
Published
07/21/2021
Singer Halsey gives birth to newborn baby.

Halsey and Alev Aydin Welcome Their First Child

profile picture of Lauren Barth
Lauren Barth
Senior Editor
Published
07/19/2021
Article removed.