What to Expect After Baby Arrives (and How to Handle The Changes!)

profile picture of Jayne Heinrich
ByJayne Heinrich
The Naptown Organizer
Updated
Mar 2017
Hero Image
Photo: Thinkstock / The Bump

Moms — I’m not talking about the cute, squishy, sweet little baby in your arms.

I’m talking about the deflated mama kangaroo pouch, the flabby arms, the back fat, the residual swelling, the thinning hair, the super frizzy hair, the tired eyes, the leaky breasts, or the mama-sized diaper you’ve been wearing around for the past few weeks.

Yep, we’re pretty hot, right?

No matter how much you love your child, celebrate your pregnancy, and celebrate your new and amazing body after you have your child (because, wow! You created a miracle! Your body should be celebrated!) — there is going to be a breaking point.  Unless you’re a supermodel or have hired a world class chef and trainer, there’s a high likelihood of frustration or disappointment with your body.

One of the most frustrating times can be a few weeks postpartum.  You’ve lost some weight, but not all of the weight you’ve gained.  Or, you’ve lost all the weight but your body looks nothing like it did before.  None of your old clothes fit, but your maternity clothes don’t really fit either.  If you’re nursing, you may be starving all the time, but afraid to eat too much and stop losing the baby weight. You’re still learning to have a newborn, and being up all night is giving you bags below your eyes that could be shipped out on a jet plane.  You may feel exhausted and can’t work out.  You may feel great, but don’t want to work out until released by your doctor at your six week checkup.

Thankfully, this time will pass.

Soon, you’ll hopefully be feeling a little bit more like yourself.  Your body will never be the same, but in time you either adjust to that and learn to accept it, or you make the goal to change it and get down to working hard to do so.

If you’re in this transitional period, keep your chin up, and accept my big, squishy, kangaroo pouched hug.

How did you deal with your postpartum self?

Related Video

Childcare Costs Continue to Rise So Far in 2020, Survey Says

Nehal Aggarwal
Associate Editor
Published
07/02/2020

Study Shows Which Expectant Dads May Adjust Easier to Fatherhood

Nehal Aggarwal
Associate Editor
Published
07/02/2020

The Top Rare Baby Names for Boys and Girls That Should Be on Your Radar

Nehal Aggarwal
Associate Editor
Published
07/02/2020

Kristen Bell Says Mom-Shaming Pushed Her to Potty Train Her 5-Year-Old

Nehal Aggarwal
Associate Editor
Published
07/02/2020

Parenting Pain Is More Prevalent Than You Might Think, Study Finds

Nehal Aggarwal
Associate Editor
Published
07/01/2020

These Boy Names Are Increasing in Popularity for Girls, Nameberry Says

Nehal Aggarwal
Associate Editor
Published
07/01/2020
Advertisement