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When to Stop Drinking Once You're Trying to Conceive

It could be time to switch from cocktails to mocktails—here's why.
ByPaula Kashtan
Updated
March 2, 2017
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You’re not pregnant yet—so does that mean you can still enjoy a few drinks safely? Really, you should stop drinking alcohol as soon as you start trying to conceive.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), alcohol can affect baby’s development in the very first weeks—even before you know you’re pregnant—and could potentially lead to miscarriage, stillbirth or a range of lifelong physical, behavioral, and intellectual disabilities for baby (otherwise known as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders). If you find yourself pregnant and haven’t been a teetotaler, don’t freak out—chances are baby will be fine if you stop drinking now.

The bottom line is there’s no known safe level of alcohol consumption during pregnancy—so while it may be a fun way to get in the mood, it’s best to stick to your favorite  lovemaking tunes, mocktails and sexy lingerie to light the fire. If you drink, you’ll risk spending the next nine months worrying if those few sips were harmful for baby. And believe us, you’ll have much better things to think about.

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