BookmarkBookmarkTickBookmarkAddCheckBoxFilledCheckBoxCircleBumpCheckedFilledMedical

Why Mandy Moore Won’t Be Getting an Epidural

The This is Us star will have an unmedicated birth due to a rare autoimmune disorder known as immune thrombocytopenic purpura.
save article
profile picture of Wyndi Kappes
By Wyndi Kappes, Associate Editor
Published August 2, 2022
Mandy Moore attends Baby2Baby 10-Year Gala Presented by Paul Mitchell at Pacific Design Center on November 13, 2021 in West Hollywood, California
Image: Axelle/Bauer-Griffin/Getty Images

When it comes time to welcome baby number two in October, Mandy Moore won’t be asking for an epidural.

The This is Us star will have an unmedicated birth due to a rare autoimmune disorder known as immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). According to Johns Hopkins Medicine, ITP is a blood disorder characterized by a decrease in the number of platelets in the blood. Platelets are cells in the blood that help stop bleeding, and a decrease in platelets can cause easy bruising, bleeding gums and internal bleeding.

In Moore’s case, her regularly low platelet count means placing an epidural could cause injury around the spinal cord. The actress told TODAY parents that for this reason, she would have to have an unmedicated birth, as she had done with her 17-month-old son, Gus.

“It was awful. But I can do it one more time. I can climb that mountain again,” Moore told TODAY. “I wish medication was an option—just the idea of it being on the table is so nice. But we’ll just push forth like we did last time.”

On July 28, Moore shared an ITP update with her followers on Instagram. “I am fine. I just have to continue to get my blood checked—my platelet levels checked—throughout pregnancy. They’re low, but they’ve always been low,” Moore explained in her Instagram story. “But I’m all good. Everything’s good.”

The beloved actress and singer first announced that she and her husband, Taylor Goldsmith, were expecting their second baby boy on June 3. The couple revealed the news on Instagram with a sweet picture of their one-year-old son August wearing a big brother shirt.

“One incredibly seminal chapter of my life just ended, and the next one, as a mother of two, is about to start…and are we ever so deeply grateful and excited,” Moore shared in the caption. “Baby Boy Goldsmith #2 coming this fall! Tour is gonna be slightly different than I expected, but I can’t wait, and Gus is gonna be the BEST big brother!! Xo”

Since her pregnancy announcement, Moore has made the decision to end her tour early to focus on her health and has drawn attention to the need for all moms-to-be to take a minute to rest. “It’s hard to slow down. It’s difficult to feel like you’re letting yourself or anyone else down. It’s disappointing to admit you can’t do it all sometimes,” Moore shared in an Instagram post. “But it’s also empowering to give yourself permission to be human and take a breath. We all need it. To prioritize rest over hustle.”

save article
Article removed.
Name added. View Your List
ADVERTISEMENT

Next on Your Reading List

doctor examining pregnant woman's belly for membrane sweep
What Is a Membrane Sweep—and How Can It Induce Labor?
Medically Reviewed by Kendra Segura, MD
evening primrose oil
Is It Safe to Induce Labor With Evening Primrose Oil?
Medically Reviewed by Kendra Segura, MD
mother who just gave birth holding newborn baby in hospital bed
Expert Tips for How to Prevent Tearing During Birth
Medically Reviewed by Kendra Segura, MD
ADVERTISEMENT
couple packing hospital bag for birth
Hospital Bag Checklist: What to Pack in Hospital Bag
Medically Reviewed by Kendra Segura, MD
pregnant woman doing exercises to induce labor
Exercises to Help Induce Labor
Medically Reviewed by Kendra Segura, MD
What Does It Mean to Have a Breech Baby?
What Does It Mean to Have a Breech Baby?
Medically Reviewed by Kendra Segura, MD
pregnant woman with IV in arm during labor
The Lowdown on Using Pitocin During Labor
Medically Reviewed by Kendra Segura, MD
ADVERTISEMENT
close up of newborn baby sleeping on mother's chest after labor and delivery
The Best Labor and Delivery Gowns for Comfort and Convenience
By Christin Perry
pregnant woman sitting in bed
How to Do Perineal Massage to Prepare for a Vaginal Delivery
Medically Reviewed by Kendra Segura, MD
pregnant woman sitting at home
What to Know About the Transverse Baby Position
Medically Reviewed by Kendra Segura, MD
ADVERTISEMENT
pregnant woman sitting in bed holding belly
What Does Baby's Fetal Station in Labor and Delivery Mean?
Medically Reviewed by Kendra Segura, MD
mother holding newborn baby after giving birth in hospital
What Happens Right After Baby Is Born?
By Liz Callahan Schnabolk
man helping woman through labor and delivery
9 Ways to Support Your Birthing Partner During Labor and Delivery
Medically Reviewed by Kendra Segura, MD
ADVERTISEMENT
woman in labor with eyes closed
A Quick Guide to HypnoBirthing and Its Techniques
Medically Reviewed by Kendra Segura, MD
pregnant woman in active labor in hospital bed
What Is Active Labor?
Medically Reviewed by Kendra Segura, MD
smiling same sex female couple sitting together and looking at one of their pregnant bumps
What You Need to Know About a Mucus Plug
Medically Reviewed by Kendra Segura, MD
pregnant woman sitting at home looking at ultrasound photos
What Is Considered a Full-Term Pregnancy—and Why Does It Matter?
Medically Reviewed by Kendra Segura, MD
ADVERTISEMENT
pregnant woman going through labor in hospital
What Does Back Labor Feel Like?
Medically Reviewed by Kendra Segura, MD
close up of pregnant woman sitting in passenger seat of car
What Is Precipitous Labor? (and What to Do if It Begins)
Medically Reviewed by Kendra Segura, MD
unrecognizable pregnant woman talking to doctor
What to Know About Group B Strep in Pregnancy
Medically Reviewed by Kendra Segura, MD
ADVERTISEMENT
Article removed.